RAP-10
Output Channels 2 at 44.1, 22.05, or 11.025kHz, 16 or 8 bit. (Any combination of the above, for example play 1 channel at 22.05kHz 8-bit, and the other at 44.1kHz 16-bit).
Output Rate/Resolution 44.1 kHz (max.), 16-bit
Digital Input Stereo jack, 44.1, 22.05, or 11.025kHz, 16 or 8 bit. (Any combination of the above, for example, record 1 channel at 22.05kHz 8-bit, and the other at 44.1kHz 16-bit simultaneously).
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GM Patches (128) in ROM. 6 Drum kits. 26 voice polyphony. (Digital audio has its own 2 voices). 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections Joystick (MIDI), stereo line/mic in, stereo aux in, stereo line out, stereo headphone. All jacks are mini plugs. CD audio internal connector.
System Req. 1 port, 1 IRQ, 2 DMA channels.
Driver Support Windows 3.x. (will also work on Win 95/98), Window NT/2000 (without digital audio -- GM Synth and MIDI I/O only, via MPU-401 driver)
Compatibility MPU-401 (UART). Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) $249

The RAP-10 is essentially the SCC-1's MIDI Synth (first 128 patches only, like the SCD-10) with 2 tracks of CD-quality digital audio added. As such, it sports the much-acclaimed Roland Sound Canvas waveform set as found in cards like the SCC-1, SCD-10, SCD-15, and SC-7 (but not the newer Sound Canvasses such as the SC-88, which have newer waveform sets and improved playback circuitry). The RAP-10 does not support replacing any of its GM waveforms.

The RAP-10 has a digital reverb (with choices of various rooms or halls, decay time, and level) which can alternately be used as a delay (with repeats and delay time adjustable). Furthermore, the RAP-10 has a chorus (with feedback, delay, rate and depth). These effects can be applied both to the MIDI Synth Parts as well as digital audio (with separate reverb/delay and chorus levels for each Part and each of the two tracks).

In fact, the RAP-10's digital audio tracks each have a number of settings including tuning (in both half steps and cents), panning, reverb level, chorus level, volume, brightness, and sample rate. For playback, these can be adjusted via System Exclusive messages (ie, so any software that supports System Exclusive can be used to adjust all of these parameters) even during digital audio playback. In essense, the RAP-10 allows a lot of the realtime control over digital audio tracks that it allows for one of its GM MIDI Synth Parts (but by using SysEx instead of Controller messages).

The MIDI Synth Parts understand and respond to Channel Pressure (which can be used to control Brightness, Volume, Vibrato Depth, and/or Vibrato Rate, with each Part responding to Pressure in any or no combination of the above ways, independently of other Parts), Modulation (which can be used to control Vibrato Speed and/or Depth), Volume Controller, Effect1 Controller (ie, reverb level), Effect3 Controller (ie, chorus level), Hold Pedal Controller, Expression Controller, Pan Controller, Pitch Bend, Program Change, Reset All Controllers, All Sounds Off, and All Notes Off.

Furthermore, using Registered Parameter Number Controller, each Part's Pitch Bend Range, as well as tuning (in half steps and cents) can be controlled. Using Non-registered Parameter Number Controller, you can control the pan, volume, tuning, chorus level, and reverb level for each drum sound in a kit (in addition to being able to control the entire kit's overall volume, pan, chorus level, and reverb level).

The RAP-10 has a master Volume and master tuning (ie, for all 16 Parts and 2 digital audio tracks) in both half steps and cents.

The RAP-10 ships with a Windows MCI driver that will work under Win95, and also some software that graphically mimics a multi-track mixer for recording/playback. The bundled program is more geared for hobbyist and multi-media work than pro musician's use. The RAP-10 can be used with pro software such as CakeWalk, SAW, Sound Forge, or other Windows titles, utilizing both its MIDI Synth and digital audio simultaneously. You can also use OS/2's RTMIDI MPU-401 driver, but this will not enable digital audio tracks (ie, GM sound module control only). (You could even use Win95's MPU-401 driver, but this also won't enable digital audio tracks).

In order to obtain the actual MIDI In/Out/Thru jacks, you need to attach a "breakout box" to the joystick port. The joystick port is compatible with the Sound Blaster, so any breakout box for the SB will suffice (ie, you don't need the overpriced MCB-10).


SC-7
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 16-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GM Patches (128) in ROM. 6 Drum kits. 24 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections COM port, MIDI In/Out, stereo line outs (RCA jacks), headphone (mini), stereo line inputs (mini), AC power (uses a wall-wart).
Controls Volume knob.
System Req. Attaches to computer's serial port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Windows 95/98 (if you use the Roland Win95/98 serial driver available on Roland's web site).
Compatibility Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) $207

The SC-7 is essentially the SCC-1's MIDI Synth (first 128 patches only, like the SCD-10) in an external box that attaches to the computer's serial port. (It can attach to both the IBM and Mac serial ports, and instructions are given on using the SC-7 with either. This is a cheap way for Mac owners to get a nice, low cost Roland GM sound module). As such, it sports the much-acclaimed Roland Sound Canvas waveform set as found in cards like the SCC-1, SCD-10, SCD-15, and RAP-10 (but not the newer Sound Canvasses such as the SC-88, which have newer waveform sets and improved playback circuitry). The SC-7 does not support replacing any of its GM waveforms, nor does it record/play digital audio.

See the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SC-7's MIDI Synth engine. It's the same as the RAP-10's, so all RAP-10 remarks (except as concern digital audio tracks) are pertinent (ie, its effects and support for MIDI messages is the same).

The SC-7 is a complete, standalone unit. It can be used without the computer. It has its own power supply and case. An external keyboard (or other MIDI controller) can be plugged directly into the SC-7 MIDI In to play it as a 16-Part multi-timbral module.

The SC-7 ships with a Windows MCI driver, and also some software (Ballade, a sequencer, and Band in a Box). It can be used with pro sequencers such as CakeWalk.

Furthermore, because the SC-7 offers MIDI In and Out jacks to which you can attach even more MIDI gear, it becomes a MIDI interface between your computer and all other external gear. This makes the SC-7 nice for laptop use since it allows connecting external MIDI gear via a clone or Mac serial port, is a 16-part multi-timbral unit also, and can even be used without the computer. It's very small, light, and therefore portable.


SCC-1 (SCC-1B)
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 16-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (354) in ROM. 9 Drum kits. 24 voice polphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size 4 MEG (compressed) ROM
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections MIDI In/Out, 2 line outs (RCA), stereo headphone (mini).
System Req. 1 port, 1 IRQ.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Win 95/98, Window NT/2000, or any operating system that has an MPU-401 driver.
Compatibility MPU-401 (UART and Intelligent). MT-32. Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) $275

The SCC-1 is a MIDI Synth only (ie, no digital audio, ie, WAVE recording/playback). It sports the much-acclaimed Roland Sound Canvas waveform set as found in cards like the RAP-10, SCD-10, SCD-15, and SC-7 (but not the newer Sound Canvasses such as the SC-88, which have newer waveform sets and improved playback circuitry). The SCC-1 does not support replacing any of its GS waveforms.

See the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SCC-1's MIDI Synth engine. It's the same as the RAP-10's (with extra patches and drum kits, plus recognition of Bank Select Controller to select such), so all RAP-10 remarks (except as concern digital audio tracks) are pertinent (ie, its effects and support for MIDI messages is the same). The SCC-1's Parts do have a few extra parameters that can be adjusted, which the RAP-10 and SC-7 do not have, such as Attack Time and Filter Resonance.

Early SCC-1 units had less than 354 patches (ie, didn't have the extra MT-32 sounds). The only difference between new SCC-1 units and the SCC-1B appears to be that the latter includes bundled software, such as a nice patch editor (ie, although you can't change the GM waveforms used in a patch, you can adjust VCA and VCF envelopes to contour the sound. This is different than the RAP-10 or SC-7 more hard-wired GM Patch sets). The SCC-1 also offers MT-32 sounds (but not without some of the patch customization that the MT-32 offered). MT-32 sounds are mediocre by today's audio standards, but some older games were designed to support MT-32 rather than GM.

Furthermore, the SCC-1 has a fully intelligent MPU-401 compatibility, so it understands all MPU-401 commands. (That's not as important today since most software, especially Windows stuff, no longer uses MPU-401 Intelligent Mode).

The SCC-1 ships with a Windows MCI driver, (and the SCC-1B with some apps), which will also work under Windows 95 (but you're better off using Win95's MPU-401 driver instead). It can be used with pro sequencers such as CakeWalk. You can also use OS/2's RTMIDI MPU-401 driver.

Roland has replaced the SCC-1 with a package containing the MPU-401/AT and SCD-15 daughterboard. It's essentially the same thing as an SCC-1B. (I forget what they call this combo deal).


SC-55
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 16-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (317) in ROM. 9 Drum kits. 24 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections COM port, MIDI In/Out, stereo line outs (RCA jacks), headphone (mini), stereo line inputs (RCA), AC power (uses a wall-wart).
Controls Volume knob, LCD, parameter buttons (ie, Volume, Pan, Reverb, Chorus, Transpose, Instrument, MIDI CH, Part #, Mute Part).
System Req. Attaches to computer's serial port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Windows 95/98 (if you use the Roland Win95/98 serial driver available on Roland's web site).
Compatibility Windows Drivers. MT-32.
Street Price (U.S.) ???

The SC-55 is essentially the SCC-1B (with a few less patches) in an external box that attaches to the computer's serial port. (It can attach to both the IBM and Mac serial ports).

See the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SC-55's MIDI Synth engine. It's the same as the SCC-1B's, so all SCC-1B remarks are pertinent.

The SC-55 is a complete, standalone unit. See the SC-7 description for what advantages Roland standalone units offer.


SC-155

Same as SC-55 except for:

Controls Volume knob, 8 sliders, LCD, parameter buttons.

The SC-155 is the SC-55 in a table top unit (ie, the SC-55 is a half-rack unit) with the addition of 8 sliders to control various parameters of 8 parts (plus a button to switch the sliders to control the other 8 parts). With sliders, the SC-155's parameters can be more easily manipulated while playing the unit. Sliders also can send MIDI messages to record their movements with a sequencer.


CM-300

Same as SC-55 except for:

Controls Volume knob.

The CM-300 is the SC-55 with all controls except the Volume knob removed. As such, you need computer software to change parameters (via MIDI).

Roland also made the CM-500 which is the CM-300 with an MT-32 added inside of it.


SC-35

Same as SC-55 except for:

MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (223) in ROM. 8 Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Controls Volume and Aux In Vol knobs, 3.5" floppy drive, parameter and sequencer (Play, Stop, Rec, Rew, FF, Pause, Tempo, etc) buttons.

The SC-35 is essentially the SC-55 plus a Sound Brush (ie, a sequencer that records and plays standard MIDI files off of a built-in 3.5 inch floppy drive) in one box. As such, the SC-35 is a standalone General MIDI file player/recorder. It also has 4 extra voices of polyphony, but omits the MT-32 patches.

See the SC-55 description for remarks about the SC-35's features.


SC-33

Same as SC-55 except for:

MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (226) in ROM. 8 Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Controls Volume knob, LCD, editing buttons.

The SC-33 is the SC-55 but with editing capabilities over the "tones" (ie, waveform parameters such as VCA envelopes, VCF envelopes, etc) to design your own patches. It also has 4 extra voices of polyphony, but omits the MT-32 patches.


SC-50
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 18-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (226) in ROM. 8 Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections COM port, MIDI In/Out, stereo line outs (RCA jacks), headphone (mini), stereo line inputs (RCA), AC power (uses a wall-wart).
Controls Volume knob, LCD, editing buttons.
System Req. Attaches to computer's serial port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Windows 95/98 (if you use the Roland Win95/98 serial driver available on Roland's web site).
Compatibility Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) ???

The SC-50 is essentially the SC-55 without the MT-32 sounds, but appears to have improved playback circuitry (including 18-bit DACs). The MT-32 sounds are mediocre by today's audio standards, so are really only useful for older games that support MT-32 but not GM.

Also, the SC-50 has 4 extra voices of polyphony over the SC-55.

See the SC-55 description for remarks about the SC-50's features.

The SC-50 does have an LCD panel and knobs, so that SC-50 Patch parameters can be edited from the SC-50 itself (as opposed to the SC-7 and SC-55 requiring a software "patch editor" to change various parameters).


SC-88
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 18-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (654) in ROM. 24 Drum kits. 64 voice polyphony. 32-Part multi-timbral via 2 MIDI inputs.
Sound ROM Size 8 MEG compressed. (16 MEG)
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb. Delay. Chorus. EQ.
Connections COM port, 2 MIDI In/Out (THRU), stereo line outs (RCA jacks), headphone (mini), stereo line inputs (RCA), AC power cord.
Controls Volume knob, LCD, editing buttons.
System Req. Attaches to computer's serial port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Windows 95/98 (if you use the Roland Win95/98 serial driver available on Roland's web site).
Compatibility Windows Drivers. MT-32
Street Price (U.S.) ???

The SC-88 is an external box that attaches to the computer's serial port. (It can attach to both the IBM and Mac serial ports). It contains not only the SCC-1's waveform set, but also newer waveforms (over 300 more) and improved playback circuitry (including 18-bit DACs). It also has many more effects (and reverb and delay are separate units now, so Reverb, Delay, Chorus, and EQ are simultaneous). The SC-88 therefore offers a substantially different and improved MIDI Synth than all other Roland Sound Canvas cards (except the SC-55mkII). The SC-88 does not support replacing any of its waveforms, nor does it record/play digital audio.

The SC-88 is a complete, standalone unit. It can be used without the computer. It has its own power supply and case. An external keyboard (or other MIDI controller) can be plugged directly into the SC-88 MIDI In to play it as a 16-Part multi-timbral module. A second controller can be plugged into the second MIDI In to play 16 more multi-timbral parts. (In order to use all 32 mult-timbral parts with the computer, you have to have the latest version of Roland's MIDI serial driver, available from Roland's web site, under Products/Software updates. This driver turns the serial port into 2 separate MIDI Outs, each with 16 MIDI channels).

Furthermore, because the SC-88 offers MIDI In and Out jacks to which you can attach even more MIDI gear, it becomes a MIDI interface between your computer and all other external gear. This makes the SC-88 nice for laptop use since it allows connecting external MIDI gear via a clone or Mac serial port, is a multi-timbral unit also, and can even be used without the computer.

The SC-88 does have an LCD panel and knobs, so that its Patch parameters can be edited from the SC-88 itself (as opposed to the SC-7 and SC-55 requiring a software "patch editor" to change various parameters). The SC-88VL is the same as the SC-88 expect that it doesn't have the patch editing knobs (ie, like the SC-7 and SC-55, it requires computer software to change its patch settings).


SC-55mkII
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 18-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (354) in ROM. 8 Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No Information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb. Delay. Chorus. Flange.
Connections COM port, MIDI In/Out, stereo line outs (RCA jacks), headphone (mini), stereo line inputs (RCA), AC power (uses a wall-wart).
Controls Volume knob, LCD, editing buttons.
System Req. Attaches to computer's serial port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x., Windows 95/98 (if you use the Roland Win95/98 serial driver available on Roland's web site).
Compatibility Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) ???

The SC-55mkII is sort of like half of an SC-88 (in terms polyphony and parts, but also with less waveforms too), and has improved waveforms and circuitry over older sound canvasses.


SCD-10
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 16-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GM Patches (128) in ROM. 6 Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections None. (Uses host card's output stage).
System Req. Attaches to host card. (ie, It's a Sound Blaster compatible daughterboard).
Driver Support Uses host card's driver.
Compatibility Depends upon host card. Designed for an SB or compatible.
Street Price (U.S.) $149

The SCD-10 is essentially the SCC-1's MIDI Synth (first 128 patches only) in the form of a daughterboard that attaches to a Sound Blaster's Waveblaster connector. (It is not a self-contained card). The SCD-10 does not support replacing any of its GM waveforms, nor does it record/play digital audio (which is left up to the host card).

See the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SCD-10's MIDI Synth engine. It's the same as the RAP-10's, so all RAP-10 remarks (except as concern digital audio tracks) are pertinent (ie, its effects and support for MIDI messages is the same).

Unlike self-contained Roland cards such as the SCC-1, RAP-10, or SC-7, the SCD-10 uses its host's output stage, which in typical Sound Blaster cards and compatibles, is not quite as noise and distortion free as Roland cards.

The SCD-10 ships with some strictly hobbyist software (DoReMi and Easy Juke). It can be used with pro sequencers such as CakeWalk, provided your host card has proper driver support.

One real advantage of the SCD-10 (and SCD-15) over other Roland cards is that, since these cards attach to an SB compatible host, they offer the best audio solution to a game player. The RAP-10's digital audio hardware is not SB compatible, and therefore not supported by game software (which is typically MS-DOS software that writes directly to hardware rather than Windows software that uses MCI drivers). The other Roland cards do not offer digital audio playback. So they can't be used to play voice and sound effects in games (which are usually done with WAVE files. On the other hand, since most game software can play its background music via an MPU-401 port, all Roland cards can be used to play background music for those games). The SCD-10, in combo with its host, offers a complete solution, as the host plays voice and sound effects, and the SCD-10 with its renowned Roland waveform set plays the background music, without requiring two separate sound cards.


SCD-15
Output Channels 2
Output Rate/Resolution 16-bit @ 44.1KHz
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (354) in ROM. Numerous Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections None. (Uses host card's output stage).
System Req. Attaches to host card. (ie, It's a Sound Blaster compatible daughterboard).
Driver Support Uses host card's driver.
Compatibility Depends upon host card. Designed for an SB or compatible.
Street Price (U.S.) $185

The SCD-15 is the same thing as the SCD-10 except that it has the full set of GS patches (ie, 354 instead of only 128) plus some MT-32 sounds. It has a few extra drum kits too. Otherwise, all other remarks concerning the SCD-10 apply to the SCD-15.

The extra patches are really not of much use to game players since most game software sticks to the smaller GM set of patches. A musician seeking a greater variety of sounds for MIDI file recording/playback may find the extra GS patches more useful, although the extra MT-32 sounds are mediocre by today's audio standards.


MPU-401/AT
Output Channels None
Output Rate/Resolution None
Digital Input None
MIDI Synth None
Sound ROM Size None
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects None
Connections MIDI In and Out. SB compatible WaveBlaster connector. Stereo line outs (RCA).
System Req. 1 Port, 1 IRQ.
Driver Support Win 3.x., Windows 95/98, Windows NT/2000, OS/2, or any other OS with an MPU-401 device driver.
Compatibility MPU-401 (UART and Intelligent). Windows drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) $68 (With the SCD-15 daughterboard, $228)

The MPU-401/AT is a MIDI interface card without any built-in sound module nor digital audio tracks. It is meant to control external MIDI units as well as any SB compatible daughterboard plugged into the MPU-401/AT's internal connector (such as the SCD-10 or SCD-15. In fact, putting an SCD-15 into an MPU-401/AT gives you essentially an SCC-1B). But, the MPU-401 itself is not SB compatible (ie, it accomodates SB daughterboards, but is not an SB compatible card itself, and therefore will not work with software requiring SB compatibility).

It offers MPU-401 Intelligent and Uart modes. An advantage of using this card as the host for an SCD-10 or SCD-15 is that this card's audio output circuitry is cleaner and quieter than what is normally found in an SB type card.

Earlier MPU-401 units did not have the daughterboard connector. The very first MPU-401 was actually an external box containing all of the Roland circuitry and MIDI jacks. This box attached into a secondary card that plugged into the ISA bus. Later, Roland reduced its chipset size, and was able to fit everything onto one ISA card that fit into the computer. This was the MPU-IPC. Recently, Roland added the daughterboard connector, for the MPU-401/AT. (I recommend the MPU-401/AT, as there were also some improvements in MIDI throughput made).


SCP-55B
Output Channels 2 at 44.1, 22.05, or 11.025kHz, 16 or 8 bit. (Any combination of the above, for example play 1 channel at 22.05kHz 8-bit, and the other at 44.1kHz 16-bit).
Output Rate/Resolution 44.1 kHz (max.), 16-bit
Digital Input Stereo jack, 44.1, 22.05, or 11.025kHz, 16 or 8 bit. (Any combination of the above, for example, record 1 channel at 22.05kHz 8-bit, and the other at 44.1kHz 16-bit simultaneously).
MIDI Synth WaveTable synth, GS Patches (354) in ROM. Numerous Drum kits. 28 voice polyphony. 16-Part multi-timbral, with the option to set Parts to any channels or disable Parts.
Sound ROM Size No information
Custom Sample Upload None
Effects Digital reverb/delay. Chorus.
Connections With MCB-3 connector, it has MIDI IN and OUT, stereo mic in, stereo line in, and stereo line out (mini jack).
System Req. PCMCIA port.
Driver Support Windows 3.x. Windows 95/98.
Compatibility Windows Drivers.
Street Price (U.S.) $315

The SCP-55B is essentially the SCC-1's MIDI Synth in the form of a PCMCIA card that plugs into a PCMCIA slot on a computer. The SCP-55B does not support replacing any of its GM waveforms. Unlike the SCC-1, the SCP-55B incorporates the RAP-10's digital audio capabilities.

See the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SCP-55B's MIDI Synth engine. It's the same as the SCC-1B's, so all SCC-1B remarks are pertinent. Furthermore, see the RAP-10 description for remarks about the SCP-55B's digital audio tracks.

The SCP-55B is ideal for laptop computers with a PCMCIA slot. The SCP-55B can simultaneously play full MIDI scores along with 2 tracks of CD-quality audio (recorded/played to the Hard Drive). Therefore, multi-media presentations can be made with full background music scores and sound effects/voice narration happening simultaneously, at very good sound quality.

The SCP-55B needs the MCB-3 to provide external MIDI jacks and output/input jacks.

The SCP-55B ships with several Windows titles, including CakeWalk Express (create/play MIDI files), and Macromedia Action (a multi-media authoring tool).

NOTES:

All cards use Roland's own proprietary chipsets.

One nice thing about the Roland cards which they have over cheap cards is a hardware buffered MIDI output. This allows the computer's CPU to typically stream MIDI messages to the card without requiring the CPU to wait for the card to accept MIDI bytes. With the RAP-10, this can even happen at the full bus speed of 8MHz, resulting in a more stable timing for sequenced playback, especially under CPU-taxing OS's such as Windows. Other cards typically make the CPU wait until the card has shifted out a MIDI byte at 32KHz before the card will accept another byte.

Street prices were obtained from ComputAbility, a typical computer mail order firm (800-554-9948) during the time when these products were available new.

The sales/distribution for Roland's line of computer cards has been taken over by Edirol.