PENTECOST  20C  proper 23

 

October 10,  2010       

PENTECOST 20C proper 23

October 10, 2010   

 SCRIPTURES
Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7 Prophecy by mail: "Build houses ... plant gardens ... take wives ... multiply there .... Seek the welfare of this city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its [Babylon's] welfare you will find your welfare."
Psalm 66:1-12
2 Timothy 2:8-15 (2nd of 4 weeks) "Remember Jesus Christ, raised from the dead ... the word of God is not chained ... the saying is sure: If we have died with him, we will also live with him; if we endure ... if we deny ... if we are faithless ..."
Luke 17:11-19 The cleansing [healing] of ten lepers and the thanks of one who is a "foreigner."


- Jesus was also "On his way" (to cross)

- Leviticus 13:45 requires a leper to shout "Unclean, unclean!" to warn uninfected people to keep their distance.  

- Leviticus 13-14 governs the inspection of suspected lepers, their isolation, and the procedure for declaring the healed leper clean. It deals with infected clothing and houses as well as infected persons.

People tend to regard leprosy not just as a medical condition but also as a sign of God's judgment. That makes them less compassionate than they might otherwise be, because they believe that the person has brought suffering upon him/herself.

-Leviticus 13 requires priests to examine skin lesions to determine whether they are leprous. If the lesion appears not to be leprous on first examination, Leviticus 13 requires a confirming examination after seven days.  

-The lepers can go to the temple in Jerusalem to find a priest, but they can find priests in other communities as well. When the Promised Land was divided among the tribes, the descendants of Aaron were not given a territory, but were instead allocated thirteen cities with their pasturelands (Josh. 21:10-19). Priests typically serve a week of duty periodically at the temple and reside elsewhere the rest of the time.  

-The lepers were not healed immediately, but instead are healed as they obey Jesus' command. "The healing of lepers functions in the Gospel as a sign of the power of God's kingdom" (Culpepper, 325). 

-Luke saves this surprise until late in the story. "The model of faith turns out to be the ultimate outsider" (Cousar, 554). Luke is himself a Gentile, a foreigner. He delights in recounting stories of foreigners whom God has blessed, and he makes foreigners (even Samaritans) the heroes of his stories. "The story anticipates what is yet to come in Acts (also written by Luke): a growing blindness in Israel, a receptivity among Gentiles" (Craddock, Interpretation, 203).  

-Samaria had been the home of the ten tribes of Israel (as distinct from the tribes of Judah and Benjamin in the south). When the Assyrians took the Israelites into exile in the eighth century B.C., many non-Jewish people came to live in Samaria. Returning exiles inter-married with those Gentiles. As a result, Jews loathe Samaritans, whom they consider to be religiously compromised. "That is why it is so ironic in a Jewish context that from time to time the 'hero' of an episode or parable is a Samaritan" (Evans, 258).

-If we will learn to celebrate life as a gift -- and to express our thanksgiving for the gift -- it will change our lives.

-The sight and recognition are every bit as much a gift as the healing itself

-Ten were healed; one turned back; that one was Samaritan. What is the message of this simple story? Speculation about the other nine draws our attention away from what Scripture is seeking to teach.

-In ordinary life
we hardly realize that we receive a great deal more than we give,
and that it is only with gratitude that life becomes rich.  
It is very easy to overestimate the importance of our own achievements
in comparison with what we owe others.  Dietrich Bonhoeffer

-The Samaritan, upon recognizing that he had been cleansed of his leprosy did not go to the priest as Jesus instructed the ten, but instead he came back to thank Jesus. One could make several things out of this action. First, since the Samaritan, presumably, was not Jewish, he would not have felt compelled to show himself to the priest. There could be a subtle message here of inclusion of those outside of Judaism. Second, the Samaritan treated Jesus as the priest by presenting himself to Jesus. Third, he viewed Jesus as the source of his cleansing and wished to thank him for the cleansing. And finally, the Samaritan’s interaction with Jesus suggests a relationship of some sort between the two. Robert Flaherty

--If we will learn to celebrate life as a gift -- and to express our thanksgiving for that gift -- it will change our lives.

-"Dessert First." God gives us his best first. When we respond in thanksgiving, it changes the entire of our relationship with him from one of law (obedience - doing only what is required of us) to one of grace (love freely given - returning to give thanks). That is what happened to the Samaritan.

-There are several parallels between this story and the story of Naaman, the Gentile who was also healed of leprosy (2 Kings 5:1-19).  

-“Leprosy” is a skin disease that made a person ritually unclean. A leper was treated as an outcast and was not allowed to participate in the religious life of the community. See Lev. 13:45-46

-Where is God anyways?  What is worship anyways? (one word will do) What’s so massive about religion anyways?  Lindy



SERMON                                          TRUE WORSHIP   I love this scripture because when you stop to think about it, it shows us the real meaning of worship. Lindy

-Healing,” “health,” “wholeness,” “wellness,” and “holy” all share the same etymological root, meaning “full.”  
- What is worship? One leper turning back. Luther
- Where's the one who followed his heart instead of his instruction? BB Taylor
- Where are the nine? We are here, right here....BB Taylor
- The Other Good Samaritan.
- Birds don’t sing because they’ve learned how but because they have a song to sing.
- We become what we worship: money (hard); fame, (shallow); power (tyrannical; pleasure (soft.)
- Wonder is the basis of worship.
-   Response
- Worship is acting out our beliefs.
- Making God famous...celebrating God...putting God on a pedestal.
- celebration
- Worship is not Democratic. (The creature is not equal to creator)
- Religion (ritual)  can get in the way of true worship.  Lindy
 - Birds don’t sing because they’ve learned how but because they have a song to sing.
- We become what we worship: money (hard); fame, (shallow); power (tyrannical; pleasure (soft.)
- Wonder is the basis of worship.
- Worship is response
- Worship is acting out our beliefs.
- Making God famous...celebrating God...putting God on a pedestal.
- celebration
- Worship is not Democratic. (The creature is not equal to creator)
- Religion (ritual)  can get in the way of true worship.  Lindy


 


QUOTES
- Religion is massive....faith is a mustard seed unknown
-You can't really tell someone to be thankful, they would be putting on an act. Thankfulness comes from within.
- I know how to be obedient but I do not know how to be in love. BB Taylor.
- God demolishes belief to clear space for faith.  BBTaylor  
-Whether we live in God's care, or die in God's embrace, we have healing and wholeness. Frederick Niedner
-We can be more than cured, we can be healed or made whole.
-Religion is about ritual, Faith is about relationships.
-Religion (ritual) can get in the way of true worship. Lindy
- Mankind must realize that it is in need of healing, not from the outer world, but form within. Carolyn Warfield
-Gratitude is the necessary attitude
-Gratitude is the heart’s memory
-Eucharist is Greek for thanksgiving.
- Gratitude is more than skin deep. Lindy
-For me, the difference between thanksgiving and thanks-living is between
giving thanks on one day and living thanks always. Thanksgiving is a
terminal event. Thanks living is a way of life. Fairchild
-I was always taught that when someone does something for you, turn around and thank THEM by doing something for SOMEONE ELSE. Lindy
- Thanks living
Gratitude for many has become yet another "should". for other, it is just another form of manipulation.
Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all virtues. Cicero
 Gracias, merci, Danka, Grazie...(Spanish, French, Russia, Italian) for Thankyou.
Eucharist means thanksgiving.
 Seeing the glass half full rather than half empty.
 Grace and gratitude belong together like heaven and earth. Barth
 Gratitude is cosmic generosity.
 Gratitude is the heart's memory. French
-We drink the water and tend to forget the glass.
Gratitude produces happiness not happiness produces gratitude.


METAPHORS
1. Can opener: Look inside!!! the things inside us are what counts and moves us in the right direction. Lindy
2.Thanks should be an echo when we're given something great.
Thanks should be the shadow which from the gift you cannot separate.
Thanks should grow like flowers when showered from above.
Thanks should flow like kisses which follow upon love. Hoffman.....
3. We scratch the fly and kill the itch." lindy Go after less important stuff.


ILLUSTRATIONS
-Gratitude seems to help. A guard at the Kingston Pen, where some of the worst criminals in Canada are lodged. He told me the real baddies are those who can never say thank you for anything, whatever you do for them. But once an inmate begins to express gratitude for little favors, and then begins to thank God, change has begun. He may still have more years to serve his time, but there is hope at the end of the road.

-The Wolf and the Crane, Aesop Gratitude and greed go not together.
A Wolf had been gorging on an animal he had killed, when suddenly a small bone in the meat stuck in his throat and he could not swallow it. He soon felt terrible pain in his throat, and ran up and down groaning and groaning and seeking for something to relieve the pain. He tried to induce every one he met to remove the bone. "I would give anything," said he, "if you would take it out." At last the Crane agreed to try, and told the Wolf to lie on his side and open his jaws as wide as he could. Then the Crane put its long neck down the Wolf's throat, and with its beak loosened the bone, till at last it got it out. "Will you kindly give me the reward you promised?" said the Crane. The Wolf grinned and showed his teeth and said: "Be content. You have put your head inside a Wolf's mouth and taken it out again in safety; that ought to be reward enough for you."
-Androcles Aesop A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled to the forest. As he was wandering about there he came upon a Lion lying down moaning and groaning. At first he turned to flee, but finding that the Lion did not pursue him, he turned back and went up to him. As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which was all swollen and bleeding, and Androcles found that a huge thorn had got into it, and was causing all the pain. He pulled out the thorn and bound up the paw of the Lion, who was soon able to rise and lick the hand of Androcles like a dog. Then the Lion took Androcles to his cave, and every day used to bring him meat from which to live. But shortly afterwards both Androcles and the Lion were captured, and the slave was sentenced to be thrown to the Lion, after the latter had been kept without food for several days. The Emperor and all his Court came to see the spectacle, and Androcles was led out into the middle of the arena. Soon the Lion was let loose from his den, and rushed bounding and roaring towards his victim. But as soon as he came near to Androcles he recognized his friend, and fawned upon him, and licked his hands like a friendly dog. The Emperor, surprised at this, summoned Androcles to him, who told him the whole story. Whereupon the slave was pardoned and freed, and the Lion let loose to his native forest. Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.
-Gratitude even in hard times. Thanksgiving. A national holiday to give God thanks. Especially in times of adversity. While thanksgiving festivals have been celebrated to mark the harvest throughout history, we can trace this notion back to the Civil War when President Lincoln dedicated such a national day in 1863. In those dark days of America, Lincoln must have realized that, in the midst of that horrible struggle, the nation had much to be thankful for.

CHILDREN

- Talk about grace at meal time. A good source of table graces Bless the Food Upon the Dishes 
- Talk about why gratitude should not just be obedience (Like when we were young and parents told us, "Say, thank you".)
- Do an Aesop's fable. (above)
- Tell the Rickenbaker story. (above)

HUMOR
- Do you think a leopard can change his spots?" All the students in the class said, "No," except for one little girl. Asked to explain, she said, "If a leopard doesn't like the spot he's in, I don't see why he can't change it."
- Charles L. Brown, description of what happened to the other 9: One waited to see if the cure was real. One waited to see if it would last. One said he would see Jesus later. One decided that he had never had leprosy. One said he would have gotten well anyway. One gave the glory to the priests. One said, "Oh, well, Jesus didn't really do anything." One said, "Any rabbi could have done it." One said, "I was already much improved."

PRAYERS
-We thank you for this place in which we dwell, for the love that unites us, the peace accorded to us this day, the hope with which we expect the morrow, for health, for work and for joy.
-When I pray with a person facing surgery or serious illness, I pray for the physical healing that is possible - and I pray further for the WHOLENESS that is internal as well as external
-A Gaelic blessing: Deep peace: of running waves to you; of the flowing air to you; of the quiet earth to you; of the shining stars to you; of the gentle night to you; moon, and stars pour their healing light on you. Deep peace to you.


"If you haven't seen http://www.textweek.com/ you're missing a great resource for ministers."
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 SCRIPTURES

  • Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7 Prophecy by mail: "Build houses ... plant gardens ... take wives ... multiply there .... Seek the welfare of this city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its [Babylon's] welfare you will find your welfare."
  • Psalm 66:1-12
  • 2 Timothy 2:8-15 (2nd of 4 weeks) "Remember Jesus Christ, raised from the dead ... the word of God is not chained ... the saying is sure: If we have died with him, we will also live with him; if we endure ... if we deny ... if we are faithless ..."
  • Luke 17:11-19 The cleansing [healing] of ten lepers and the thanks of one who is a "foreigner."

SCRIPTURES

- Jesus was also "On his way"  (to cross)

 

- Leviticus 13:45 requires a leper to shout "Unclean, unclean!" to warn uninfected people to keep their distance.  

- Leviticus 13-14 governs the inspection of suspected lepers, their isolation, and the procedure for declaring the healed leper clean.  It deals with infected clothing and houses as well as infected persons.

People tend to regard leprosy not just as a medical condition but also as a sign of God's judgment.  That makes them less compassionate than they might otherwise be, because they believe that the person has brought suffering upon him/herself.

 

-Leviticus 13 requires priests to examine skin lesions to determine whether they are leprous.  If the lesion appears not to be leprous on first examination, Leviticus 13 requires a confirming examination after seven days.  

-The lepers can go to the temple in Jerusalem to find a priest, but they can find priests in other communities as well.  When the Promised Land was divided among the tribes, the descendants of Aaron were not given a territory, but were instead allocated thirteen cities with their pasturelands (Josh. 21:10-19).  Priests typically serve a week of duty periodically at the temple and reside elsewhere the rest of the time.  
 

-The lepers were not healed immediately, but instead are healed as they obey Jesus' command.  "The healing of lepers functions in the Gospel as a sign of the power of God's kingdom" (Culpepper, 325). 
 

-Luke saves this surprise until late in the story.  "The model of faith turns out to be the ultimate outsider" (Cousar, 554).  Luke is himself a Gentile, a foreigner.  He delights in recounting stories of foreigners whom God has blessed, and he makes foreigners (even Samaritans) the heroes of his stories.  "The story anticipates what is yet to come in Acts (also written by Luke):  a growing blindness in Israel, a receptivity among Gentiles"  (Craddock, Interpretation, 203).  

 

-Samaria had been the home of the ten tribes of Israel (as distinct from the tribes of Judah and Benjamin in the south).  When the Assyrians took the Israelites into exile in the eighth century B.C., many non-Jewish people came to live in Samaria.  Returning exiles inter-married with those Gentiles.  As a result, Jews loathe Samaritans, whom they consider to be religiously compromised.  "That is why it is so ironic in a Jewish context that from time to time the 'hero' of an episode or parable is a Samaritan" (Evans, 258).

 

-If we will learn to celebrate life as a gift -- and to express our thanksgiving for the gift -- it will change our lives.
 

-The sight and recognition are every bit as much a gift as the healing itself

 

-Ten were healed; one turned back; that one was Samaritan. What is the message of this simple story? Speculation about the other nine draws our attention away from what Scripture is seeking to teach.

 

-In ordinary life
we hardly realize that we receive a great deal more than we give,
and that it is only with gratitude that life becomes rich.  
It is very easy to overestimate the importance of our own achievements
in comparison with what we owe others.  Dietrich Bonhoeffer
 

 

-The Samaritan, upon recognizing that he had been cleansed of his leprosy did not go to the priest as Jesus instructed the ten, but instead he came back to thank Jesus.  One could make several things out of this action.  First, since the Samaritan, presumably, was not Jewish, he would not have felt compelled to show himself to the priest.  There could be a subtle message here of inclusion of those outside of Judaism.  Second, the Samaritan treated Jesus as the priest by presenting himself to Jesus.  Third, he viewed Jesus as the source of his cleansing and wished to thank him for the cleansing.  And finally, the Samaritan’s interaction with Jesus suggests a relationship of some sort between the two. Robert Flaherty

 

--If we will learn to celebrate life as a gift -- and to express our thanksgiving for that gift -- it will change our lives.

 

-"Dessert First." God gives us his best first. When we respond in thanksgiving, it changes the entire of our relationship with him from one of law (obedience - doing only what is required of us) to one of grace (love freely given - returning to give thanks). That is what happened to the Samaritan.

 

-There are several parallels between this story and the story of Naaman, the Gentile who was also healed of leprosy (2 Kings 5:1-19).  
 

-“Leprosy” is a skin disease that made a person ritually unclean.  A leper was treated as an outcast and was not allowed to participate in the religious life of the community.  See Lev. 13:45-46

 

-Where is God anyways?   What is worship anyways?  (one word will do) What’s so massive about religion anyways?  Lindy


SERMON                                    TRUE WORSHIP

   I love this scripture because  when you stop to think about it, it shows us the real meaning of  worship.  Lindy

 

 -Healing,” “health,” “wholeness,” “wellness,” and “holy” all share the same etymological root, meaning “full.”  

- What is worship?  One leper turning back.  Luther

- Where's the one who followed his heart instead of his instruction? BB Taylor

-  Where are the nine?  We are here, right here....BB Taylor

-  The Other Good Samaritan.

Birds don’t sing because they’ve learned how but because they have a song to sing.

-  We become what we worship: money (hard); fame, (shallow); power (tyrannical; pleasure (soft.)

-  Wonder is the basis of worship.

-   Response

-  Worship is acting out our beliefs.

-  Making God famous...celebrating God...putting God on a pedestal.

-  celebration

-  Worship is not Democratic. (The creature is not equal to creator)

-  Religion (ritual)  can get in the way of true worship.  Lindy

 -  Birds don’t sing because they’ve learned how but because they have a song to sing.

-  We become what we worship: money (hard); fame, (shallow); power (tyrannical; pleasure (soft.)

-  Wonder is the basis of worship.

-  Worship is response

-  Worship is acting out our beliefs.

-  Making God famous...celebrating God...putting God on a pedestal.

-  celebration

-  Worship is not Democratic. (The creature is not equal to creator)

-  Religion (ritual)  can get in the way of true worship.  Lindy

 


          

QUOTES

- Religion is massive....faith is a mustard seed  unknown      

-You can't really tell someone to be thankful, they would be putting on an act. Thankfulness comes from within.

- I know how to be obedient but I do not know how to be in love. BB Taylor.

- God demolishes belief to clear space for faith.  BBTaylor  

- Worship is:  “One leper turning back”  Luther    

-Whether we live in God's care, or die in God's embrace, we have healing and wholeness. Frederick Niedner

-We can be more than cured, we can be healed or made whole.

-Religion is about ritual, Faith is about relationships.

-Religion (ritual)  can get in the way of true worship.  Lindy

- Mankind must realize that it is in  need of healing, not from the outer world, but form within.  Carolyn Warfield

-   ".What I did not know then is that in that hospital, we the student chaplains were buying into the medical model of being cured: cut out the cancer, do the heart bypass, set the broken bone, prescribe the medication for pain and for killing the virus. If we could not do that, what good were we?  Here is what I have learned, what I knew all along, but did not see, what you must know in your own lives, that to be cured is one thing, to be healed is another. ..To be cured is to get rid of one particular ailment.  To be healed is to be at peace with our  whole self and the world around us. Someone can be cured yet not be fully healed.  On the other hand, someone can be dying on their death bed and at the same time be healed....be at peace with their neighbor, their world, their God, and themselves." Gary E. Smith     

-- He who never changes never mends

-Healed conflict makes a stronger bond.  Yin and yang

-There is a schedule for healing

-We cannot heal except we are willing to hurt. 

-We are all wounded healers.

-Godly power depends on INSIDE things

- the cause is “In here” which means that “In here” can heal it.

-So all ten of those lepers were cured, but only one of them was made whole, (Healed)

-…-At the last supper Jesus gave thanks just when everything was going from bad to worse. The next day he would be unjustly condemned, scourged, mocked, and crucified till he bled to death in agony. But he was already giving thanks it would turn out to be the most wonderful event in the world. We call it Good Friday. In a few minutes we are going to share in the Eucharist. In Greek eucharizein means to give thanks. As we take the bread and the wine, we are going to be thankful for everything we can think of, however bad at the time. In the old prayer book we used to say "for our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of life."

-Gratitude is the necessary attitude

-Gratitude is the heart’s memory

-Eucharist is Greek for thanksgiving.

- Gratitude is more than skin deep.  Lindy

-For me, the difference between thanksgiving and thanks-living is between
giving thanks on one day and living thanks always.  Thanksgiving is a
terminal event.  Thanks living is a way of life. Fairchild

-I was always taught that when someone does something for you,  turn around and thank THEM by doing something for SOMEONE ELSE. Lindy

- Thanks living

METAPHORS

1.  Can opener:   Look inside!!!  the things inside us are what counts and moves us in the right direction.  Lindy

2.Thanks should be an echo when we're given something great.
Thanks should be the shadow which from the gift you cannot separate.
Thanks should grow like flowers when showered from above.
Thanks should flow like kisses which follow upon love.  Hoffman.....

3. We scratch the fly and kill the itch." lindy  Go after less important stuff. 

 

ILLUSTRATIONS

-Gratitude seems to help. A guard at the Kingston Pen, where some of the worst criminals in Canada are lodged. He told me the real baddies are those who can never say thank you for anything, whatever you do for them. But once an inmate begins to express gratitude for little favors, and then begins to thank God, change has begun. He may still have more years to serve his time, but there is hope at the end of the road.

-

It is gratitude that prompted an old man to visit an old broken pier on the

eastern seacoast of Florida. Every Friday night, until his death in 1973, he

would return, walking slowly and slightly stooped with a large bucket of

shrimp. The sea gulls would flock to this old man, and he would feed them

from his bucket. Many years before, in October, 1942, Captain Eddie

Rickenbacker was on a mission in a B-17 to deliver an important message to

General Douglas MacArthur in New Guinea. But there was an unexpected detour which would hurl Captain Eddie into the most harrowing adventure of his life. Somewhere over the South Pacific the

Flying Fortress became lost beyond the reach of radio. Fuel ran dangerously

low, so the men ditched their plane in the ocean. for nearly a month Captain

Eddie and his companions would fight the water, and the weather, and the

scorching sun. They spent many sleepless nights recoiling as giant sharks

rammed their rafts. The largest raft was nine by five. The biggest

shark...ten feet long. But of all their enemies at sea, one proved most

formidable: starvation. Eight days out, their rations were long gone or

destroyed by the salt water. It would take a miracle to sustain them. And a

miracle occurred. In Captain Eddie's own words, "Cherry," that was the B-17

pilot, Captain William Cherry, "read the service that afternoon, and we

finished with a prayer for deliverance and a hymn of praise. There was some

talk, but it tapered off in the oppressive heat. With my hat pulled down over

my eyes to keep out some of the glare, I dozed off." Now this is still Captain Rickenbacker talking..."Something landed on my head. I knew that it was a sea gull. I don't know how I knew, I just knew. Everyone else knew too. No one said a word, but peering out from under my hat

brim without moving my head, I could see the expression on their faces. They

were staring at that gull. The gull meant food...if I could catch it."

And the rest, as they say, is history. Captain Eddie caught the gull. Its

flesh was eaten. Its intestines were used for bait to catch fish. The

survivors were sustained and their hopes renewed because a lone sea gull,

uncharacteristically hundreds of miles from land, offered itself as a

sacrifice. You know that Captain Eddie made it. And now you also know...that he never forgot. Because every Friday evening, about sunset...on a lonely stretch along the eastern Florida seacoast...you could see an old man walking...white-haired, bushy-eyebrowed, slightly bent.

His bucket filled with shrimp was to feed the gulls...to remember that one

which, on a day long past, gave itself without a struggle...like manna in the

wilderness. "The Old Man and the Gulls" from Paul Harvey's The Rest of the Story by Paul

Aurandt, 1977, quoted in Heaven Bound Living, Knofel Stanton, Standard, 1989,

pp. 79-80

 

-The Wolf and the Crane, Aesop   Gratitude and greed go not together.
A Wolf had been gorging on an animal he had killed, when suddenly a small bone in the meat stuck in his throat and he could not swallow it. He soon felt terrible pain in his throat, and ran up and down groaning and groaning and seeking for something to relieve the pain. He tried to induce every one he met to remove the bone. "I would give anything," said he, "if you would take it out." At last the Crane agreed to try, and told the Wolf to lie on his side and open his jaws as wide as he could. Then the Crane put its long neck down the Wolf's throat, and with its beak loosened the bone, till at last it got it out. "Will you kindly give me the reward you promised?" said the Crane. The Wolf grinned and showed his teeth and said: "Be content. You have put your head inside a Wolf's mouth and taken it out again in safety; that ought to be reward enough for you."

-Androcles Aesop A slave named Androcles once escaped from his master and fled to the forest. As he was wandering about there he came upon a Lion lying down moaning and groaning. At first he turned to flee, but finding that the Lion did not pursue him, he turned back and went up to him. As he came near, the Lion put out his paw, which was all swollen and bleeding, and Androcles found that a huge thorn had got into it, and was causing all the pain. He pulled out the thorn and bound up the paw of the Lion, who was soon able to rise and lick the hand of Androcles like a dog. Then the Lion took Androcles to his cave, and every day used to bring him meat from which to live. But shortly afterwards both Androcles and the Lion were captured, and the slave was sentenced to be thrown to the Lion, after the latter had been kept without food for several days. The Emperor and all his Court came to see the spectacle, and Androcles was led out into the middle of the arena. Soon the Lion was let loose from his den, and rushed bounding and roaring towards his victim. But as soon as he came near to Androcles he recognized his friend, and fawned upon him, and licked his hands like a friendly dog. The Emperor, surprised at this, summoned Androcles to him, who told him the whole story. Whereupon the slave was pardoned and freed, and the Lion let loose to his native forest. Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.

-Gratitude even in hard times. Thanksgiving. A national holiday to give God thanks. Especially in times of adversity. While thanksgiving festivals have been celebrated to mark the harvest throughout history, we can trace this notion back to the Civil War when President Lincoln dedicated such a national day in 1863. In those dark days of America, Lincoln must have realized that, in the midst of that horrible struggle, the nation had much to be thankful for.

 

CHILDREN

- Talk about grace at meal time. A good source of table graces    Bless the Food Upon the Dishes 

- Talk about  why gratitude should not just be obedience  (Like when we were young and parents told us, "Say, thank you".)

- Do an Aesop's fable. (above)

- Tell the Rickenbaker story. (above)

 

HUMOR

- Do you think a leopard can change his spots?" All the students in the class said, "No," except for one little girl. Asked to explain, she said, "If a leopard doesn't like the spot he's in, I don't see why he can't change it."

- Charles L. Brown,   description of what happened to the other 9: One waited to see if the cure was real. One waited to see if it would last. One said he would see Jesus later. One decided that he had never had leprosy. One said he would have gotten well anyway. One gave the glory to the priests. One said, "Oh, well, Jesus didn't really do anything." One said, "Any rabbi could have done it." One said, "I was already much improved."

 

PRAYERS

-We thank you for this place in which we dwell, for the love that unites us, the peace accorded to us this day, the hope with which we expect the morrow, for health, for work and for joy. 

-When I pray with a person facing surgery or serious illness, I pray for the physical healing that is possible - and I pray further for the WHOLENESS that is internal as well as external

-A Gaelic blessing:  Deep peace:  of running waves to you; of the flowing air to you;  of the quiet earth to you;  of the shining stars to you; of the gentle night to you; moon, and stars pour their healing light on you.  Deep peace to you.

 

 

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